Twelve Common Questions About Celiac Disease

Celiac.com 09/18/2019 – At Celiac.com, we get all kinds of questions about celiac disease. Here are some of the most common questions we see. Is celiac disease a food allergy to wheat, rye or barley? While it’s true that people with celiac disease must avoid wheat rye or barley, celiac disease is not a food allergy, it is an auto-immune disease. Find out more about the differences between food allergies and food intolerance. What foods are gluten-free? You can find Celiac.com’s extensive list of safe gluten-free foods and ingredients here. What foods contain gluten? You can find Celiac.com’s extensive list of unsafe gluten-free foods and ingredients here. What are the main symptoms of celiac disease? Classic symptoms of celiac disease include gastrointestinal symptoms, like upset stomach, abdominal pain, gas, bloating, indigestion, and diarrhea. Many celiacs suffer from many these and other symptoms on a regular basis. However, many others show few or no symptoms. No single set of signs or symptoms is typical for everyone with celiac disease. Signs and symptoms almost always vary from person to person. How common is celiac disease? Celiac disease is one of the most common chronic health disorders in western countries. It is also one of the most under-diagnosed. Recent studies and advances in diagnosis show that at least 3 million Americans, or around 1% of people have it, but less than 1 in 5,000 cases is ever diagnosed. Here are some celiac numbers compared to other diseases. Can people with celiac disease drink alcohol? People with celiac disease can drink alcohol. They still need to avoid consuming wheat, rye and barley directly. Even though the scientific consensus is that distilled beverages contain no gluten, many celiacs choose to consume only alcohol which is labeled ‘gluten-free.’ Others freely consume alcohol distilled from cereal grains, including whiskey and gin, with no noticeable problems. To find out more, check out our list of gluten-free alcoholic beverages. Do people with celiac disease have a higher risk of other diseases? People with celiac disease do have a higher risk of certain associated diseases, including Addison’s disease, peripheral neuropathy, Crohn’s Disease, congenital heart disease, epilepsy, and many more. Is celiac disease genetic or hereditary? Celiac disease is heavily influenced by genetics. Having certain genes can increase a person’s risk of developing celiac disease. Also, people with first-degree relatives who have celiac disease face a significantly higher risk for developing celiac disease. Can genetic testing help to spot celiac disease? Genetic tests for celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are readily available. Testing can be performed on either blood and mouth swab samples. Tests can be done at home and mailed to the lab for analysis. Does eating gluten in childhood influence celiac disease risk? Researchers have been busily hunting for celiac risk factors in children. A recent study showed that every daily gram increase in gluten intake in 1-year olds increases the risk of developing celiac disease autoimmunity by 5%. Can celiac disease cause mental problems? There is no evidence that celiac disease causes mental problems directly. However, celiac disease is associated with several mental conditions, including schizophrenia. Also, at least one recent study shows evidence of a link between gluten sensitivity and acute mania. Can celiac disease cause skin problems? Celiac disease is associated with at least seven skin conditions.

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The Keto diet not as healthy as people think — Sonoma State Star – The university’s student-run newspaper – Sonoma State Star

The Keto diet not as healthy as people think — Sonoma State Star – The university’s student-run newspaper  Sonoma State Star

In a time where celebrities and fitness influencers alike are discussing their diets and workout routines to lose weight and look amazing, normal people can often …

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The Connection Between Celiac Disease Autoimmunity and Psychopathology in Children

Celiac.com 09/17/2019 – Celiac disease is associated with psychopathology in children. However, it’s unknown whether this connection is present in children with celiac disease autoimmunity identified by screening. A team of researchers recently set out to examine the associations between sub-clinical celiac disease autoimmunity and emotional and behavioral problems in children without a previous celiac disease diagnosis. The research team included Rama J. Wahab, Sytske A. Beth, Ivonne P.M. Derks, Pauline W. Jansen, Henriëtte A. Moll, and Jessica C. Kiefte-de Jong. As part of a population-based cohort study, the team analyzed levels of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies in 3,715 children averaging 6 years of age. After excluding children with diagnosed celiac disease or those on a gluten-free diet, the team found 51 children with celiac disease autoimmunity, defined as levels of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies at or above 7 U/mL. To assess behavioral and emotional problems of children averaging 5.9 years old, they used a Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) completed by the parents. They applied multiple linear regression models to assess the cross-sectional connections between celiac disease autoimmunity and CBCL scores. They also conducted sensitivity analyses in a subgroup of seropositive children with HLA antigen risk alleles for celiac disease. The data showed that celiac disease autoimmunity, especially combined with the HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 risk alleles, is associated with anxiety problems and oppositional defiant problems. The team is calling for more research to determine whether behavioral problems might be an indication of sub-clinical celiac disease. Read more in Pediatrics The researchers are variously affiliated with the Generation R Study Group; the Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands; the Departments of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology; the Psychology, Education, and Child Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands; and the Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Campus The Hague, Leiden University Medical Center, The Hague, Netherlands.

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