RDs! We’re Hiring! Looking To Fill A Full-Time Permanent Position With My New Venture Constant Health (Telecommuters Welcome!)

Since 2004, Constant Health’s expert team has been at the forefront behavioural weight management, and now, by leveraging the best that technology has to offer, the goal is to share that expertise while eliminating geographic boundaries. Our headquarters are in Ottawa, but our team stretches across Canada from Halifax to Vancouver.

We believe that there is no one best way to lose weight, but rather that every individual has a healthiest life that they can enjoy and Constant Health is there to try to help people cultivate theirs and in so doing, help them to find their best weights.

Using the latest research into weight management, behavioural psychology, and nutrition, Constant Health’s data driven approach provides the regular feedback required both for clients to improve their weights, but also for our team to continually improve our technology.

In addition to our strong clinical team, we have a team of experienced professionals with deep expertise in mobile design, development, integration, and project delivery for iPhone, iPad and Android platforms.

If you have a passion for health, fitness, and technology we’d love to hear from you.

Job description

Constant Health, a dietitian delivered chronic disease management company that utilizes its own proprietary behavioural intervention technology tools is looking for a permanent full time dietitian to join our professional and unique team.

We are looking for an individual who loves working with people and technology, is great at multi-tasking, is a team player, thrives off of challenges and responsibility, and wants to utilize his or her skills in making a dramatic positive difference in people’s lives.

Responsibilities will include:

  • Collaboration with interprofessional team members.
  • One-on-one virtual counselling sessions via Constant Health’s proprietary platform to motivate and help patients live the healthiest lives they can with an emphasis on diabetes and/or weight management
  • Design individualized nutrition plans based on each individuals’ unique lifestyles, and dietary likes and dislikes.
  • Write for Constant Health’s different social media outlets: Website, blog, vlog, and monthly newsletter.

The skills you’ll need:

  • Exceptionally strong motivational counselling skills.
  • Must have excellent listening skills, empathetic and sensitive to patient’s needs. We do not ever utilize negative reinforcement in our counselling.
  • Able to adapt nutrition advice to recent scientific research with thoughtful critical appraisal and for a wide variety of diets – from keto and intermittent fasting, to balanced deficits, to plant-based whole foods, to everything in between, because at Constant Health we recognize that the key to long term success is actually enjoying your chosen diet.
  • Must be innovative and give patients realistic and helpful nutrition advice.
  • Positive and non-restrictive approach to weight management.
  • Comfortable giving presentations.
  • Possess sound professional judgment, initiative and enthusiasm.
  • Good time management skills and ability to organize.
  • Excellent computer skills, and comfort with social media
  • Strong cooking skills.

The requirements we’re looking for:

  • Minimum one year of clinical experience
  • Registered Dietitian
  • Member of the College of Dietitians of Ontario and in good standing (or willingness and ability to join).
  • Master level clinicians and/or Certified Diabetes Educators are preferred, although not required.
  • Previous experience working in weight management and diabetes care is an asset.

Because we are looking for the best candidate our wages are highly competitive with those in the community ($59K – 70K/year depending on qualifications) and after the 3 month probation period, medical and dental benefits are part of our package.

Interested candidates can send along their CV to careers @ constanthealth.ca

We look forward to hearing from and meeting with you.

        
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Saturday Stories: The Scamedemic, The “Great” Barrington Declaration, Sweden, And The John Snow Memorandum

 

Tony Scott, in SFGate, on how he used to call it the ‘scamedemic’. He doesn’t anymore. 

Marc Lipsitch, Gregg Gonsalves, Carlos del Rio, and Rochelle P. Walensky, in The Washington Post, on the why the so-called Great Barrington Declaration is far from well named.

Kelly Bjorklund and Andrew Ewing, in Time, cover the disastrous truths of COVID in Sweden.

And as a response to renewed interest in herd immunity and that Great Barrington Declaration comes a competing declaration, the John Snow Memorandum, which explains why herd immunity strategies are dangerous and why, and unlike the Barrington document, does not include the signatures of Dr. Person Fakename, Professor Notaf Uckingclu, Dr. Johnny Fartpants, Dr. Very Dodgy Doctor, Dr. Brian Blessed Doctor in Winged Flight (truly, they are actual Barrington signatories)

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Arthur Kleinman’s Eight Questions

The 2020 Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines for Adult Obesity stress the importance of patient-centred care and ensuring that we understand the patient’s story. In this context, it may be a good idea to consider presenting the patient with Arthur Kleinman’s eight questions. These questions evolved from Kleinman’s work as a medical anthropologist working across a range of ethnic populations and are particularly helpful in approaching patients of other cultures – but nut not just those. What do you call your problem? What name do you give it? What do you think has caused it? Why did it start when it did? What does your sickness do to your body? How does it work inside you? How severe is it? Will it get better soon or take longer? What do you fear most about your sickness? What are the chief problems your sickness has caused for you (personally, family, work, etc.)? What kind of treatment do you think you should receive? What are the most important results you hope to receive from the treatment? The answers to these questions – which the patient can formulate ahead of the clinical encounter – can provide important insights and form the basis of an explanatory model towards understanding the patient’s interpretation of their disease state and their health beliefs including their worldview, culture, social context, and spirituality. For more on Arthur Kleinman and his Explanatory Model click here @DrSharmaBerlin, D

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Saturday Stories: Vitamin D, The New England Journal of Medicine, Toxic Masculinity, And Super-Spreading

Gid M-K, in Medium, tells us what we do and don’t know about Vitamin D and COVID

The Editors of and in The New England Journal of Medicine, on with paragraphs of fire regarding the coming American election.

Ed Yong, in The Atlantic, on how toxic masculinity is insufficient as a COVID treatment

Zeynep Tufekci, in The Atlantic, on super-spreading.

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Saturday Stories: Vaccine Collaboration, Racism and COVID Coverage, and Nonsensical Athletes

Julia Belluz, in Vox, on the 156 countries teaming up on a COVID vaccine (without the US and China).

Indi Samarajiva, in Medium, on the overwhelming racism of COVID media coverage.

Karim Abdul-Jabbar, in the Los Angeles Times, on athletes, COVID, and nonsense

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Saturday Stories: Considering Risk and Great Fences

Aaron E. Carroll, in The New York Times, with a useful read on how most of us have been considering and responding to risk backwards.

Tomás Pueyo, also in The New York Times, on the need for great fences.

Photo: Ongayo / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)
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Saturday Stories: COVID Winter, Circular Errors, Mutations, And Obesity

Irfan Dhalla, in The Globe and Mail, on COVID and the rapidly approaching Canadian winter.

Ed Yong, in The Atlantic, on the recurrent errors being made that hamper progress on COVID.

Edward Holmes, in The New York Times, covers the mutating SARS-CoV2 virus and why we needn’t be worried (yet).

And in case you missed it, I had the chance to chat with some friends from McGill’s Science in Society division about COVID, obesity, moral panics, and more:

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