Can’t find gluten free ramen? Just spend two days making your own!

Not sure why the picture looks terrible, but rough recipe(s) below! Overall, I spent way too much money, time, and effort to have an amazingly flavorful, complex dish that I couldn’t buy even if I wanted to. Worth all the effort!

EDIT: Just substitute gluten free tamari for soy sauce in every recipe and double check your nori and I think that’s the only gotchas to watch for.

EDIT 2: Slightly better picture. http://imgur.com/a/6xNpSeT

Pork Belly:

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/03/chashu-pork-marinated-braised-pork-belly-for-tonkotsu-ramen-recipe.html

Broth:

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/02/rich-and-creamy-tonkotsu-ramen-broth-from-scratch-recipe.html

Tare: (Couldn’t find the link but it’s from /u/ramen_lord )

“This is an update after all, so I wanted a more soy sauce forward tare for this bowl.

This is a combination of several methods I’ve found. This method does differ from the tare used in my tonkotsu recipe, since I want the soy flavor here to be much more predominant. Big ups to Ivan Orkin for the temp recommendation, which bleeds into the method a lot here. I’ve found it helped with some minor bitter flavors I experienced in previous renditions, so I’m definitely a fan of temperature control here, but I do have my own little tricks too!

Ingredients:

5-7 3 in by 3 in squares kombu

2 cups soy sauce (I use a combo of good ol Kikkoman and other variants, though dark, full salt soy sauce is most important)

¾ cup iriko niboshi

1 cup bonito flakes, lightly packed

¼ cup sake

3 tbsp mirin

1 tbsp brown sugar

The day before, soak the squares of kombu in your soy sauce overnight. This is the base, and we extract a lot of flavor here.

The day of, take your niboshi and saute them in a bit of neutral oil on high heat until fragrant in a sauce pan, about 40 seconds to a minute. We’re doing maillard stuff here, so a little brown is good.

Add your kombu and soy sauce, and bring to 176 F. At 176, discard the kombu.

Hold the mixture at 176 for 10 minutes.

Add the bonito and continue to steep for 5 more minutes.

Strain out the solids and reserve the soy base into a separate vessel.

Clean the pan, add the sake, mirin, and sugar, and cook on medium high heat until the smell of alcohol is gone, around 5-10 minutes.

Add the strained soy base, and cook over low heat until reduced to your salinity liking. You can use it right away, but I like to reduce it somewhat to keep things compact.”

Eggs: Just marinate soft boiled eggs in the pork marinade above for 4-12 hours.

Noodles: (ordered these on Amazon) Authentic Japanese Gluten Free… https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TQPRX78?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share


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